How did Barrington become part of Rhode Island?

Local historian to offer talk as part of 'Barrington 300'

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Dr. Van Edwards will present the complicated history of Barrington's birth and evolution into a Rhode Island town during a talk on Sunday, Feb. 19 at the White Church. The talk starts at 4 p.m.

Learn more about Barrington 300

Many residents do not know that Barrington was founded in 1717, not 1770, as shown on the town entrance signs. Dr. Edwards will present maps and documents that detail Barrington's changing borders, as it was first separated from West Swanzey, Mass. in 1717, then incorporated into Warren, RI in 1746, then re-founded as Barrington, Rhode Island in 1770. 

On Nov. 18, 2017, Barrington will hold its 300th birthday. This Sunday's lecture is the second presented as part of a 10-month program by Barrington 300, a town committee charged with the celebration of "300 years of progress in Barrington."

The Feb. 19 discussion will be free and refreshments will be served.

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JakeM

We would be vastly better off if the town had stuck with Massachusetts. I'd love to know what it would take to rejoin.

Wednesday, February 15 | Report this
Honoré de Balzac

Agreed! - The entire state of RI should be eliminated with towns east of the Providence River as well as Aquidneck Island and Jamestown going to MA, all towns west of the Providence River going to CT & Block Island going to NY

Thursday, February 16 | Report this

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