Letter: Let's remember, Barrington's schools are public

Posted

To the editor:

Last Wednesday, May 10, I attended the budget meeting. 

Mr. Grove detailed his planned budget that gave me some hope for our future in this town, living in my home that was downsized from the day that my husband and I bought it, in my neighborhood with friends that have become much loved extended families.

However, before the meeting even began, a well uniformed BHS sports team trooped up to one of the front rows reminiscent of some sort of heroes. At that, my fragile hope was pretty much shattered.  

And so I sat for a while listening to the adults in the room soap opera their needs for the “children” in the Barrington schools. 

So here is my story: My father was in the military and the military is where my brother and I grew up. We attended Air Force schools on base in places that were out of the way or in foreign countries. My kindergarten class was held in a Quonset hut. They were good well disciplined schools with great teachers but not too many frills. When we were in country, we attended public schools. My brother went to MIT and Yale and became an endocrinologist and I received a bachelor of arts in elementary education and have spent many fulfilling years in public, college and university libraries. We made our way well in life without bells and ringers.

Most of the afore said adults in the room who lined up to make their case for an expansive school budget said once again they moved to Barrington for the schools which I can only guess have not proved to meet up to all their standards. So in essence they really want the rest of the town’s residents, whether they are young, old, or just people who have spent most of their adult lives here, to pay for private schools that they do not want to pay for themselves? And there are more than enough great private schools in the state. Our schools are public schools that are paid for by the public, (all of the public) with hard earned money.

Barbara A. Flanders

Barrington

Comments

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Jazzy6812

Your experience is a military school many years ago should not serve as a model for my children attending public school in 2017. Public schools educate children with different abilities from varied backgrounds, while military schools serve a self-selecting population.

While your no-frills military school served you well, not everyone attending a military school flourished. My husband's brother struggled in a military school and eventually flunked out of college. Today, we suspect he had a learning disability that went undiagnosed and untreated thanks to the "one size fits all" military school. The "good old days" were not always good and I resent your comparison.

Your military school was funded by tax dollars from individuals who also paid taxes to support public schools. It seems to me you benefitted from generous taxpayers for your education.

Thursday, May 18 | Report this
agalag6898

Seems to me that you completely missed the point of the letter. You "resent her comparison". What a total piece of work.

Thursday, May 18 | Report this
No ax to grind, but...

Any time someone says "Think if the children!", they're after your money or your rights.

Thursday, May 18 | Report this
Tim Mize

I agree! Let's set up a tent in the parking lot of Town Hall and hold classes there. We don't need to hire competent teachers---we can show youtube videos. It's good enough. Now, how can we get the kids to walk to school uphill both ways?

Friday, May 19 | Report this

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