ForTiverton businesses, kindness and compassion as restrictions ease

Posted 5/24/21

To the editor:

After 15 months of shifting and adapting, this Small Business Month I’m reminded of important lessons I’ve learned as a Tiverton business owner that apply far beyond our …

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ForTiverton businesses, kindness and compassion as restrictions ease

Posted

To the editor:

After 15 months of shifting and adapting, this Small Business Month I’m reminded of important lessons I’ve learned as a Tiverton business owner that apply far beyond our studio walls. As we celebrate more signs of normalcy, I encourage my fellow local small business owners to embrace these lessons to support yourself and our community.

Lesson one: don’t be afraid to try something new. From learning to produce virtual on-demand classes for the first time, to renting our equipment for use at-home, our fight for survival helped us discover new opportunities for business growth. In the weeks ahead, I encourage you to try something new, too, that will help you grow your perspective. For example, consider exploring a partnership with another local business offering something outside of your scope that aligns with your values.

Lesson two: stay connected. Through COVID, staying connected to our local community through easy-to-use, free tools on Facebook and Instagram ensured that we had a base to welcome back when we re-opened. From reinforcing safety by sharing behind-the-scenes videos sanitizing our studio, to motivational posts reminding our riders to practice self-care, staying connected resulted in a community base eager to support our small business as we navigated the hurdles of re-opening. Find small ways to stay connected to the people you love even when it’s challenging – they will show up when it matters most.

Lesson three: Prepare for curveballs and pivot. COVID has presented our industry with months of uncertainty and curveballs. From challenging and changing fitness regulations to roadblocks in our journey to create new offerings, we’ve come to expect curveballs. Our studio’s ability to quickly pivot in the wake of these challenges has kept us moving forward. If we can’t make our planned outdoor classes work at Grinnell’s Beach, for example, we’ll take classes to another fun local spot. Simply put, don’t let hurdles stop your momentum – approach from a new angle.

Lesson four: be kind and compassionate. As Tiverton and our state pull back regulations, this remains a stressful time for many small businesses still fighting to survive. Kindness goes a long way. As you work through changing policies around safety regulations, be kind and have patience with our community members who are also navigating new waters. When our community widely embraces compassion and kindness – a message we often preach during our classes at SALT Cycle – Tiverton is a better place for us all.

This Small Business Month, I encourage us all to embrace these lessons as we strengthen our business community back up and move toward the other side of this pandemic.

Together with my team of talented, local female leaders, we’ve had the privilege of supporting so many members of this community with an outlet for physical and mental health during an incredibly dark year. To our community: thank you for showing up, and thank you for showing compassion and support for small businesses.

Kayla Couto

Owner, SALT Cycle Studios

Tiverton.

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