Police offer threat assessments and training to Bristol companies

By Scott Pickering
Posted 5/7/21

There’s more than one way to catch the bad guys. Police officers can catch them in the act, catch them after they commit the act — or they can stop them before anything even happens. The …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Not a subscriber?


Start a Subscription

Sign up to start a subscription today! Click here to see your options.

Purchase a day pass

Purchase 24 hours of website access for $2. Click here to continue

Day pass subscribers

Are you a day pass subscriber who needs to log in? Click here to continue.


Police offer threat assessments and training to Bristol companies

Posted

There’s more than one way to catch the bad guys. Police officers can catch them in the act, catch them after they commit the act — or they can stop them before anything even happens. The latter is a primary objective in a training program the Bristol Police Department is offering to any organization or business in the community.

Well-known for their active-shooter trainings in schools and daycare centers, the police extend that same service to private organizations, companies and faith centers. If asked, Bristol Police will analyze and assess facilities in town, provide recommendations for safety improvements, and conduct training for the people who run or work in those organizations.

A major focus of the training is recognizing warning signs before they escalate into something dangerous.

In a slideshow being released today, the Bristol Police Department describes how Covid-19 and the stressors of the past year have led to increased levels of depression, anxiety, suicidal behaviors and substance abuse throughout the population. They say the trend over the past few years is that the number of threats is rising, along with the lethal nature of those incidents. The police hope to prevent the next one from happening.

The presentations states: “We know that persons intent on committing active threats usually show pre-incident behaviors that can be observed and reported … It is imperative that if we see something, we say something, alert law enforcement or workplace staff before a situation escalates.”

The presentation states that in nearly half of past incidents, the perpetrator showed warning signs before the incident to indicate they were a threat to themselves or others.

Chris Vitale, Bristol’s economic development coordinator, is working with the police department to help publicize this public service. He said both Chief Kevin Lynch and Town Administrator Steven Contente are proud to offer the threat assessment and training throughout town.

“Unfortunately, these incidents can happen anywhere,” Mr. Vitale said. “You think your business or organization is safe, but unfortunately we live in a time where anything can happen.”

The police do not have a one-size-fits-all program, so they will adapt their assessment to each unique situation. They urge anyone who would like help developing a security plan to contact Capt. Scott McNally (ext. 215) or Lt. Steven St. Pierre (ext. 211) at the Bristol Police Department at 401-253-6900.

2021 by East Bay Newspapers

Barrington · Bristol · East Providence · Little Compton · Portsmouth · Tiverton · Warren · Westport
Meet our staff
Mike Rego

Mike Rego has worked at East Bay Newspapers since 2001, helping the company launch The Westport Shorelines. He soon after became a Sports Editor, spending the next 10-plus years in that role before taking over as editor of The East Providence Post in February of 2012. To contact Mike about The Post or to submit information, suggest story ideas or photo opportunities, etc. in East Providence, email mrego@eastbaymediagroup.com.